A Day in the Life of a Clinical Team Leader

A Day in the Life of a Clinical Team Leader

A Day in the Life of a Clinical Team Leader

As a clinical team leader the purpose of my role is to clinically lead and support a team of personal nursing assistants to ensure a high standard of safe and effective care is being delivered to all patients in their own homes. The role involves ensuring that assessments and support plans are completed and provide support to the PNA’s to ensure the standard is only ever of a high quality. The skills and competence of each PNA is based upon evidence based practice and regular training updates ensures that the team is always delivering the finest of care. As a clinical team lead regular key performance indicators, audits and on-call duty is imperative. Multi-disciplinary team working is essential for the role along with innovative methods of delivery of care to continuously improve and enhance the Hilton service.

Today my day began with a call from one of the PNA’s in my team expressing her concerns over a patient who has diabetes, who is newly diagnosed as a type 2 diabetic on insulin on her discharge from hospital. I gathered further information from the PNA on the phone and then could look at her patient file on the company drive to seek more detail from her discharge notification. I advised the PNA to inform the patient that I would come and visit within 2 hours. On arrival at the patients house I explained who I was and what my role within Hilton was as she had so many different health and social care professionals involved I felt that this was very important. At this point, there was no district nurses involved as she agreed to administer the insulin independently. The lady was very anxious and frightened about giving the insulin in the correct way and was not confident with using her glucometer. We talked through the process of testing her blood sugar levels with her new machine and then I watched her do it herself, after two times of doing this she was more comfortable already. We then discussed the type of insulin she had been prescribed and the safe administration of giving this to herself, how to attach the needle, set the units on the pen and safe disposal of sharps for after. I advised that all blood sugar levels should be recorded as it’s a good indication for the GP as to whether the insulin is helping to stabilise her blood sugars.

I documented all interventions in the communication notes and updated the support plan to ensure that the PNA’s would ensure they were monitoring this lady’s dietary intake and general wellbeing. I discussed with the patient about referring onto a diabetic specialist nurse and she consented to the referral, as our service is a 3-day service I decided for a review on day 3 to check her progress. After leaving the ladies house I liaised with the PNA’s on shift to ensure they were supporting her with her dietary intake and informed them that the support plan had been updated. This visit involved using my clinical knowledge to help the patient with her new regime, health promotion and referring on to other services for further input. The importance of liaising with the PNA’s is also imperative to ensure that they too are monitoring her progress and ensuring that she continues to feel comfortable with her new routine.

Later, this day I completed a routine observation with one of my PNA in the team, during this observation various areas are looked at such as concordance with uniform policy, dignity and respect, hand hygiene, knowledge of support plan and patient’s needs. This is a good opportunity to identify any areas for improvement and to highlight good areas of care demonstrated by that PNA. I always read through the patients file prior to the visit so that I have a good knowledge around the needs and can ensure that all needs are being met. During the visit this gentleman expressed that his tablets were very low and that he had almost ran out; the PNA knew immediately what to do in this instance and informed the patient that she would contact the GP to request more. This showed a proactive approach and was very helpful to this gentleman who is currently housebound.

After the observation is completed I write a report which then gets sent to the PNA to comment and sign, if there are no areas of concern I will routinely complete another in 6-8 weeks’ time. If any concerns were identified I would provide feedback to the PNA and observe again in 1 weeks’ time. I also update a tracker of my team’s progress to monitor performance.

My emails are checked regularly throughout the day to ensure I am available and can reply fairly promptly, today I scheduled in all the 1:1’s due this month and emailed all PNA’s with a proposed date. I also responded to and approved two staffs annual leave request as this is part of my role as CTL.